Off to court (again)

Yesterday the High Court granted leave to Gary Burns, the New South Wales Attorney General and the State of New South Wales to appeal against my win in the New South Wales Court of Appeal earlier this year.

For those who are unaware, Gary Burns is a homosexual activist. Since mid-2014 he has lodged at least 32 complaints against me for homosexual vilification.

This includes complaints that I ‘vilified’ homosexuals for criticising naked homosexual men at the Toronto Pride Parade who exposed themselves to children (you can read the offending article here). It also includes complaints that I ‘victimised’ Gary Burns by publishing emails that he sent to Islamic organisations offering them my personal details, including my residential address (you can read that offending article here).

The New South Wales Anti-Discrimination Board (ADB), being the unbiased but pro-homosexual marriage organisation that it is, somehow managed to spare time from its important business of marching at the Mardi Gras or wearing it purple to wade through Burns’ complaints, rubber stamp them and then send them off to the New South Wales Civil and Administrative Tribunal.

The ADB was so efficient at this that it even sent off one complaint twice and refused to provide me with any information about its ‘investigations’, as it is required to do so by law. By the way, this is the same ADB that included the now disgraced Emam Sharobeem – she has just been dragged before ICAC for falsifying documents and spending large amounts of public money on speeding tickets and her son’s liposuction.

Until the Court of Appeal ruling I was facing fines of up to $1.6 million for my views on marriage and morality. However, it ruled that it was unconstitutional for the New South Wales Civil and Administrative Tribunal to hear Burns’ complaints against me. Essentially, I live in Queensland and my conduct is not regulated by New South Wales laws.

The New South Wales Court of Appeal did not investigate the background of the complaints and limited its deliberations to important but fairly dry legal issues relating to jurisdiction, the role of tribunals and the power of the states and Commonwealth. The appeal to the High Court will challenge its ruling that the New South Wales Civil and Administrative Tribunal cannot hear matters against non-New South Wales residents.

Obviously, however, these dry legal issues do have very significant implications for the expression of traditional and conservative viewpoints on issues such as marriage and morality in Australia.

And that is why, once again, I will be off to court. I’ll keep you posted as events unfold.

Author: Bernard Gaynor

Bernard Gaynor is a married father of eight children. He has a background in military intelligence, Arabic language and culture and is an outspoken advocate of conservative and family values.

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6 Comments

  1. Every Committee of Public Safety needs the Sans Culottes like Gary to pack into the tribunals, denounce the aristos, name the counter revolutionaries and lead the charge of the mob against the reactionary elements. Historically, the aristos were the native aristocracy of France – not the up and coming Jewish merchant/financial class which ousted the native French from their chateaus and estates, took them over and enjoyed the full cui bono of the Revolution.

    http://leahmariebrownhistoricals.blogspot.com.au/2012/01/sans-culottes-connoisseur-of-flesh.html

    So much for Revolutionary liberty, equality and fraternity.

    But when the Committee of Public Safety becomes the de facto government (and I would say the ADB is a fledgling Committee of Public Safety if ever there was one) then the tumbrils are going to roll. Given its sweeping powers and apparatus, that the ADB has not become de facto government is due to the fact that people like Bernard Gaynor are standing up to them.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mj9nnMd3W8w&index=1&list=RDMj9nnMd3W8w
    Guerres de Vendee

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  2. Australia should be a republic with a single document that defines the limits of government and the rights of the people within​ an Australian context

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    • Patrick, totally disagree with you about the republic issue. Point in case is the USA. Take a look at what’s going at the flagrant abuse & disregard for their constitution by the Left wing nutters & your argument falls short.

      We have in fact very good laws BUT we have some corrupt individuals in positions of power ignoring the rule of law who should be removed from our society. We are in a war for culture & freedom – make no mistake about that.

      This may at some point turn into a kinetic war. The USA is getting close to erupting into civil violence & the AUS gov doesn’t want that happening here. Why else do you think our Feds are having another gun amnesty ? AND if you’ve noticed the Greens are not so quietly pooping their pants about gun ownership. Why ? Because they had one of their members shot dead by an angry farmer a few years ago & they now realise how angry SOME people get when they the Looney Left get into their life & start bullying them.

      We can do more than hope & pray. We can help people like Bernard, we can help the decent members in parliament & decent members get elected.

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  3. Good luck and may St Joseph protect you.

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  4. You may feel you are fighting this alone but there are many people who support your rights. I am only a pensioner otherwise I would support you financially. Good luck mate. This is simply not right.

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  5. My prayers are with you. Thankyou for standing up for true morality issues..
    God bless you and may God protect you and your family.

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